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Signs That You Might Be Gluten Intolerant

Gluten intolerance is no joke especially if you also suffer from Coeliac Disease.  Having the lining of your small intestine damaged isn’t much fun and it feels absolutely terrible to constantly struggle to stay awake, suffer from bloating and have to deal with diarrhea on almost a daily basis especially if you have no idea what is causing you to feel so terrible.

If you suspect that you might be gluten intolerant then it is probably best to go and visit your doctor for a proper diagnosis.  A gluten free diet has changed the lives of thousands of people who used to suffer on a daily basis and might just change your life for the better as well.  Here are the top signs of gluten intolerance:

Bloating

Bloating is very common in people and there can be many reasons or medical conditions that cause bloating.  But it is also true that 87% of people with gluten sensitivity are known to feel bloated on a regular basis.

Diarrhea

Occasional diarrhea is perfectly normal but if you are constantly suffering from diarrhea then you may also be sensitive to gluten.  50% of people with gluten sensitivity suffer from regular diarrhea.

Constipation

About 25% of gluten intolerant people struggle with frequent constipation which means that this can be a good sign that you also have gluten sensitivity.

Smellyfaeces

Poor nutrition absorption as in the case of coeliac disease usually results in terrible smelling faeces.

Abdominal pain

While abdominal pain can be caused by a great many things it is one of the most common symptoms of gluten intolerance.  In fact, 83% of people with gluten intolerance struggle with frequent abdominal pain.

Headaches

Plenty of people struggle with chronic headaches but your headaches and migraines could also be a sign of gluten intolerance.

Feeling tired

If you constantly feel fatigued, particularly after eating a meal that contains lots of gluten, then you could also be gluten intolerant.  Studies have found that 60%-80% of gluten intolerant people struggle with fatigue mostly after eating a gluten rich meal.

Skin problems

Gluten intolerance affects your ability to absorb nutrition and the sensitivity causes all sorts of imbalances and issues in your body.  As a result, many gluten intolerant people also struggle with terrible skin conditions.  Some of the most common skin diseases that gluten intolerant people struggle with include the following;

  • Psoriasis – A condition that causes your skin to become red and scalding.
  • Alopecia areata – This skin condition results in hair loss without scarring and tissue damage to the skin.
  • Chronic urticarial – This skin condition is known to cause itching, pink and red lesions with pale centers and can vary in intensity levels.

Depression

Many people today suffer from some form of depression, but plenty of gluten intolerant sufferers experience this condition because gluten intolerance causes abnormal serotonin levels, gluten exorphins interfere with your central nervous system, and changes in the gut microbial affects your nervous system.

Unexpected weight loss

Did you just lose quite a lot of weight for no apparent reason?  Then you could be suffering from coeliac disease.  Weight loss usually results from your bodies’ inability to absorb nutrition because of the damage to the lining of the intestine.

Iron deficiencygluten free meals

Iron deficiency is also very common amongst gluten intolerant people and especially in those with coeliac disease, as the large intestine no longer functions accurately and cannot absorb iron into your bloodstream.

Joint and muscle pain

Joint and muscle pain is a common sign of gluten intolerance, as frequent exposure to gluten causes inflammation in your organs and body.

If you suspect that you might be gluten intolerant then you should either see a doctor or try to exclude gluten from your diet for at least a week.  If you feel better or see an improvement then it might be best to start following the gluten free lifestyle so you can enjoy a better and healthier life.

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